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Undergowns

It is difficult to assign a single term to a garment that has been developed throughout the Middle Ages and which had many names: tunic, suknice (Czech and later German), kyrtle (English), cotte (French), cotehardie etc. The patterns shown here represent the first layer of clothing (closest to the body). For simple folk, both men and women, this was the only garment they wore most of the year, apart from their underwear, and it was almost the same for both sexes.

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Kragelund

This 12-13 century tunic was found in the Kragelund bog by Vyborg, Denmark.

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Dalmatic (tunic)

This ceremonial tunic was probably made in Palermo at the end of the 12th century.

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Pourpoint

This pourpoint belonged to Charlese de Blois from the first half of 14th century.

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Men's kirtle from Bocksten

This kirtle was found in a bog near Bocksten, Denmark, and was dated to the 2nd half of the 14th century.

 
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Herjolfsnes No.33

This dress was found in Herjolfsnes in 1840, and was dated to late 14th century.

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Herjolfsnes No.43

Men's garment with a deep cut for the neck. Late 14th century.

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Herjolfsnes No.45

A very simple short-sleeved men's garment with pocket slits, from 14th century.

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Herjolfsnes No.39

Short-sleeved woman's dress from 14th century Herjolfsnes.

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Herjolfsnes No.41

Pattern for a mens dress, which mistakenly showed up in literature as a womens cotehardie. Late 14th century.

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Herjolfsnes No.38

Womens version of the mens Herjolfsnes find #41. Late 14th century.

 
Patterns of extant garments - Shirts and Chemises, part 1
Copyright Martina a Martin Hřibovi 2006
Patterns of extant garments - Undergowns, part 2